Domestic violence, mob violence, a call for justice

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As a Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence (WSCADV) member, LifeWire echoes their statement about last week’s violent and racist attacks on democracy at the U.S. and Washington State Capitols.

“Survivors of abuse and survivor advocates recognize and understand the tactics that are being used by some elected officials, including the President, and extremist supporters: intimidation, gaslighting, use of privilege to avoid arrest or other consequences, violence, and then denying, victim-blaming, and minimizing. People who use abusive tactics often feel entitled to power and control over others. If no one holds them accountable for their abuse, they are emboldened and escalate their violence as a result. This is what allows domestic and sexual violence to continue in our society. Therefore, we refuse to be silent.”

We encourage you to take a moment to read WSCADV’s full statement.

Economic Abuse: Signs and Prevention

Table with empty wallet and a stick note with words financial abuse.

What is Economic Abuse?

When people think about domestic abuse, most people think about verbal, physical, or sexual abuse. Few people think about economic or financial abuse. Economic abuse is one of the most common forms of abuse, occurring in 99% of domestic violence situations.

Economic abuse occurs when one partner controls another’s ability to be financially independent. The lack of financial control or resources often prevents survivors from leaving.

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Youth Preventionist – UW Bothell

Reports to:  Social Change Manager
Hours: 40 hours per week
Pay Rate: $20.48-$22.01/hour DOE
Classification: Regular, Non-exempt
Reviewed: December 2020
Posting Closes: January 14, 2021

LifeWire is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. We value diversity on our staff. Survivors of domestic violence and BIPOC individuals are encouraged to apply.

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Domestic Violence and Evictions

Paper copy of eviction notice on brown front door with brass door handle

COVID-19 and evictions

Nationally, one in three renters is at risk of eviction because of financial hardship brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Even during the best of times, domestic violence survivors, especially BIPOC women, face economic hardship and are vulnerable to eviction. Women who experience recent or ongoing domestic violence are more likely to face eviction than any other group of women. And Black women face evictions at least three times the rate of other survivors.

COVID-related layoffs, reduced hours, sickness, and the loss of affordable child care have made things worse. Survivors who can no longer afford rent are worried about becoming homeless when Washington’s eviction moratorium ends on December 31 {Update: now extended to March 31, 2021}. Thanks to flexible funds from local governments, foundations, and individuals, LifeWire has provided many survivors with rental assistance, reducing their chance of becoming homeless in the coming months. Even so, too many survivors will face eviction in 2021.

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