Introducing LifeWire’s “Domestic Violence and…” Blog Series

Each person who comes through LifeWire’s doors has one thing in common – they are experiencing domestic violence. Yet every survivor’s story is unique.

Every survivor brings to the table a myriad of other factors – including income level, gender, race, immigration status, access to healthcare, sexual orientation or age – that impact the risks they face, the resources available to them and the choices they make.

Some of our participants have to choose between ending their relationship with their abusive partner or becoming homeless. Some have to choose between remaining undocumented or filing for citizenship and risking deportation. Others risk loss of professional or community status. Some fear that they will not be taken seriously.

To understand the unique barriers and challenges survivors of domestic violence face, we must also understand the other issues that impact their lives, their families and their communities.

Starting in September – through our Voices From The Field E-Newsletter – we’ll be exploring one issue at a time through the lens of domestic violence. Together, we’ll explore “Domestic Violence and…”.

Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault

“Marta” and her husband were married for 13 years and had three children. Throughout their marriage, her husband emotionally abused her, controlled her activities and regularly demanded sex as his right.

If Marta said she didn’t want to have sex, her husband begged, blamed and screamed until she gave in. If Marta asked for anything for herself or the children, Marta’s husband demanded sex as payment. 

Sometimes, Marta locked herself in the bedroom for protection, but this only resulted in her husband yelling and threatening her until she agreed to have sex with him and let him in so that he would stop frightening the kids. One day, after her husband brutally assaulted her, Marta reached out for help.

Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault”

Domestic Violence and Homelessness

Alicia has never slept in a building doorway. She and her kids have never spent the night in a tent on the streets of Seattle. But for two years, Alicia and her family were homeless.

After Alicia’s abusive partner destroyed her credit by taking out loans in her name and left her without any means to pay rent, she was evicted. She and her children spent a few months staying with various family and friends, never knowing how long they could stay. They spent the next year living out of their car. And for six months after that – before they came to LifeWire – they moved from shelter to shelter.

Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Homelessness”

Domestic Violence and Immigration

Imagine you are Maria.

After years of being abused by your husband, you finally found the opportunity to leave. On your way to your very first support group at LifeWire, you look over to the car next to you. All of a sudden a woman starts screaming at you, “Do you even speak English? Go back to where you came from.”

Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Immigration”