Domestic violence happens on the Eastside

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Becky met her former husband while backpacking in Australia. They married in Britain, but she followed him to the Eastside.

Looking back, Becky realized the abuse started while they were dating but became steadily worse after they married. He controlled all of their finances and criticized her for buying things even though they both had good-paying jobs.

Over time the violence became more physical. He shoved her and hit their dog. Finally, he strangled her. Becky reached out to LifeWire for safety planning and financial support as she worked to leave her abuser and start a new life.

During October’s Domestic Violence Action Month, LifeWire’s Executive Director, Rachel Krinsky, domestic violence survivor, Becky, spoke with Gary Shipe about domestic violence and you can do to help survivors.

Listen to the full segment here:

Domestic violence and homelessness go hand in hand

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Women and children are not part of the homeless communities we typically see in our region. You don’t pass by them on your way to work or see them at a freeway on-ramp. Yet about half of homeless people are families, and domestic violence remains a leading cause of homelessness among women and children in the U.S. today.

“Eighty percent of homeless women with children have experienced domestic violence,” said Rachel Krinsky, LifeWire’s Executive Director. “Right here in Washington state, families with children represent nearly half of the 20,000 people experiencing homelessness on any given night.”

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Charleena Lyles statement by Coalition Ending Gender-Based Violence

Re-posted from the Coalition Ending Gender-Based Violence,
of which LifeWire is a proud member.

Charleena Lyles Should Be Alive

In this moment, we send our deepest condolences to Charleena’s family and write to lift up her humanity.

To our community of advocates and others working to support survivors of violence: we see you and we are committed to supporting you.

Charleena Lyles should be alive, not dead. But in this new reality, where the memory of Charleena is a hot, bright fire, we are angry.

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Threat of deportation

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Living with the threat of deportation

For 20 years, Anna lived under the abuse and control of her American husband, who refused to allow her to become a U.S. citizen. Despite her efforts to obtain a Green Card, she needed her husband’s approval. Instead of signing her paperwork, he held the threat of deportation over her head as a method of control.

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A message to survivors

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Since 1982, we’ve held to one simple belief: that every person – regardless of race, religion, immigration status, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, or experience – deserves to live in a safe environment, free from oppression, and with the opportunity to thrive.

We’ve opened our doors day after day to survivors who have the incredible amounts of courage and strength needed to persevere. We’ve cried with you and celebrated with you. We’ve felt your pain and your joy.

We know that we will continue to face obstacles and opposing views in the coming years. Many people will try their hardest to normalize the violence and abuse you’ve experienced.

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Professional sports has a domestic violence problem

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Professional sports has a domestic violence problem.

Most recently, Josh Brown, kicker for the New York Giants, admitted to emotionally, physically, mentally, and verbally abusing his now ex-wife, Molly Brown. He also admitted to abusive behavior toward women from the age of 7 after having been sexually abused as a child.

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Eastside orgs offer help for domestic violence survivors

mom-and-daughter
Redmond Reporter
By Samantha Pak
http://www.redmond-reporter.com/news/397134331.html

When it comes to domestic violence, there is more to getting out than just exiting an abusive relationship.

Once a person leaves, some of the things they may have to deal with range from finding a new place to live and figuring out how to financially support themselves, to learning how to be safe and about the legal options they have to stay that way.

Since 1982, LifeWire has been working to help people on the Eastside and throughout the Puget Sound area with this.

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