Economic Abuse: Signs and Prevention

Table with empty wallet and a stick note with words financial abuse.

What is Economic Abuse?

When people think about domestic abuse, most people think about verbal, physical, or sexual abuse. Few people think about economic or financial abuse. Economic abuse is one of the most common forms of abuse, occurring in 99% of domestic violence situations.

Economic abuse occurs when one partner controls another’s ability to be financially independent. The lack of financial control or resources often prevents survivors from leaving.

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Domestic Violence and Evictions

Paper copy of eviction notice on brown front door with brass door handle

COVID-19 and evictions

Nationally, one in three renters is at risk of eviction because of financial hardship brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Even during the best of times, domestic violence survivors, especially BIPOC women, face economic hardship and are vulnerable to eviction. Women who experience recent or ongoing domestic violence are more likely to face eviction than any other group of women. And Black women face evictions at least three times the rate of other survivors.

COVID-related layoffs, reduced hours, sickness, and the loss of affordable child care have made things worse. Survivors who can no longer afford rent are worried about becoming homeless when Washington’s eviction moratorium ends on December 31 {Update: now extended to March 31, 2021}. Thanks to flexible funds from local governments, foundations, and individuals, LifeWire has provided many survivors with rental assistance, reducing their chance of becoming homeless in the coming months. Even so, too many survivors will face eviction in 2021.

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DV and its impact on transgender survivors

Black trans woman with curly red hair wearing a pink sweater looks in a mirror and dries her tears with a tissue.

Every person, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation, deserves to feel safe, respected, and loved in an intimate relationship

This week is Transgender Awareness Week, a time to raise the visibility of transgender people and address the issues they face. Transgender people are at high risk for abuse, with as many as 50% experiencing intimate partner violence at some point in their life. Like other survivors, they may be subject to emotional, economic, physical, and sexual abuse from their partners. Transgender survivors also face distinct abuse tactics and challenges accessing support.

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October is Domestic Violence Action Month

Over the last three decades, we have made significant progress in bringing the issue of domestic violence out of the shadows and working towards a society where everyone is free from abuse. But the COVID-19 pandemic has put many people experiencing domestic violence at greater risk than ever before. Stay-home orders and economic stresses have increased vulnerability and isolation for survivors, resulting in increased frequency and severity of abuse. At LifeWire we are seeing: Continue reading “October is Domestic Violence Action Month”

Black Lives Matter

Black Lives Matter

LifeWire stands against the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and Manuel Ellis, as well as the countless others killed by police and perpetuated by systemic racial inequality in the United States. For over 400 years, Black and Brown mothers, fathers, children, brothers, and sisters have been victimized by inequity built into the very foundation of many American institutions.

As a DV organization, LifeWire knows that Black people have a disproportionate experience of violence across our communities. A staggering forty percent of Black women will face domestic violence in their lifetimes. They’re also two and a half times more likely to be murdered by men than their white counterparts.

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