Domestic Violence and Reproductive Coercion

Empty package of birth control pills

 

What is Reproductive Coercion?

One in four survivors has experienced reproductive coercion, yet few people are familiar with the term. Reproductive coercion is any behavior aimed at controlling a person’s reproductive choices. It can take many different forms, including throwing away birth control or poking holes in condoms, lying about a vasectomy, or forcing a partner to get pregnant or have an abortion. One of the most deceptive forms of reproductive coercion is “stealthing” or removing a condom during sex without a partner’s consent. Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Reproductive Coercion”

Domestic Violence and Guns

The presence of a gun in a domestic violence situation increases the risk of homicide by 500%.
Guns and Homicide

A woman’s risk of homicide increases significantly when her abuser has access to a gun. Each month, an average of 52 American women are fatally shot by their current or former partners, and even more are injured. Women of color, especially Black, Native, and Hispanic women, are at even greater risk of being fatally shot, in large part because they have a harder time accessing services and support that can keep them safe. Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Guns”

Leaving an abusive relationship when you live together

Teal door opening to the outside

If you’ve decided it’s time to leave an abusive relationship, you may be wondering what to do next. Whether the abuse was emotional, physical, or both, it’s a good idea to plan for how to move on safely.

Before we get into that, take a moment to acknowledge how strong you are for taking care of your needs. It’s not always easy to recognize and take action when we’re being treated poorly. You deserve to be treated with love and respect, and you’ve already taken the first step on that path.

So here are some things to consider as you move forward:

Continue reading “Leaving an abusive relationship when you live together”

Domestic Violence and Mental Health

Woman standing with her eyes closed looking sad

Dealing with the mental scars of abuse

Anna started seeing LifeWire’s Mental Health Therapist because she was experiencing symptoms of severe trauma. She felt numb and disoriented, had trouble focusing at work, and was having panic attacks.

Abuse, whether physical or psychological, can affect survivors’ mental health. People who experience trauma because of domestic violence are at significantly higher risk for PTSD, depression, and anxiety. Survivors may also try to escape pain and depression with substance use or consider suicide. Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Mental Health”