Domestic Violence and Evictions

Paper copy of eviction notice on brown front door with brass door handle

COVID-19 and evictions

Nationally, one in three renters is at risk of eviction because of financial hardship brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Even during the best of times, domestic violence survivors, especially BIPOC women, face economic hardship and are vulnerable to eviction. Women who experience recent or ongoing domestic violence are more likely to face eviction than any other group of women. And Black women face evictions at least three times the rate of other survivors.

COVID-related layoffs, reduced hours, sickness, and the loss of affordable child care have made things worse. Survivors who can no longer afford rent are worried about becoming homeless when Washington’s eviction moratorium ends on December 31 {Update: now extended to March 31, 2021}. Thanks to flexible funds from local governments, foundations, and individuals, LifeWire has provided many survivors with rental assistance, reducing their chance of becoming homeless in the coming months. Even so, too many survivors will face eviction in 2021.

Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Evictions”

October is Domestic Violence Action Month

Over the last three decades, we have made significant progress in bringing the issue of domestic violence out of the shadows and working towards a society where everyone is free from abuse. But the COVID-19 pandemic has put many people experiencing domestic violence at greater risk than ever before. Stay-home orders and economic stresses have increased vulnerability and isolation for survivors, resulting in increased frequency and severity of abuse. At LifeWire we are seeing: Continue reading “October is Domestic Violence Action Month”

Not everyone can safely make a call

Woman in kitchen looking down and typing on her phone


Our helpline is staffed 24/7, but not everyone can safely make the call.

“Beth” was worried about her safety. Washington’s “Stay Home, Stay Safe” order reduced her chance of catching or spreading COVID-19, but it left her vulnerable to other dangers.

Her husband lost hours at work, which meant a smaller paycheck and more time trapped at home with him. While he never hurt her physically, the emotional abuse grew by the day, scaring Beth and their young daughter.

In her brief moments alone, Beth reached out to LifeWire via email. Working with an advocate only through email, Beth put together a safety plan and came up with ways to keep her and her daughter safer.

Become a lifeline for survivors like Beth now when they need it most and give today.

Domestic Violence and Emotional Support

Feminine hand holding feminine hand in comforting manner

Needing to talk

Joann felt overwhelmed. Her partner had never hurt her physically, but he was too controlling. He limited her access to money, pushed her friends and family away, and frequently told Joann she was crazy.

She wanted to talk with someone, to have someone listen to her concerns. But, Joann felt too embarrassed to bring it up to her sister or the friends she rarely saw, so she called LifeWire.

Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Emotional Support”

Abuse happens in college too

woman holding text books with backpack on

Did you know that dating violence is a big problem on college campuses? 43% of dating college women report experiencing violent and abusive dating behaviors, including physical, sexual, technological, verbal, or controlling abuse. But it doesn’t just affect women. Dating violence happens in opposite-sex and same-sex relationships, and people of any gender can experience dating violence.

Continue reading “Abuse happens in college too”