Domestic Violence and Child Custody

Two boys sitting and hugging on a playground
Courts as a tool for abuse

People often think that when a parent leaves an abusive relationship they will gain primary custody of the children. But many family courts don’t consider domestic violence a reason to deny the abuser partial or full child custody.

Survivors often face an uphill battle for custody. This is partly because abusers are more likely than non-abusers to challenge child custody decisions. And 70% of the time abusers succeed in getting partial or full custody of the children. Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Child Custody”

Domestic Violence and Reproductive Coercion

Empty package of birth control pills

 

What is Reproductive Coercion?

One in four survivors has experienced reproductive coercion, yet few people are familiar with the term. Reproductive coercion is any behavior aimed at controlling a person’s reproductive choices. It can take many different forms, including throwing away birth control or poking holes in condoms, lying about a vasectomy, or forcing a partner to get pregnant or have an abortion. One of the most deceptive forms of reproductive coercion is “stealthing” or removing a condom during sex without a partner’s consent. Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Reproductive Coercion”

Domestic Violence and Guns

The presence of a gun in a domestic violence situation increases the risk of homicide by 500%.
Guns and Homicide

A woman’s risk of homicide increases significantly when her abuser has access to a gun. Each month, an average of 52 American women are fatally shot by their current or former partners, and even more are injured. Women of color, especially Black, Native, and Hispanic women, are at even greater risk of being fatally shot, in large part because they have a harder time accessing services and support that can keep them safe. Continue reading “Domestic Violence and Guns”

Leaving an abusive relationship when you live together

Teal door opening to the outside

If you’ve decided it’s time to leave an abusive relationship, you may be wondering what to do next. Whether the abuse was emotional, physical, or both, it’s a good idea to plan for how to move on safely.

Before we get into that, take a moment to acknowledge how strong you are for taking care of your needs. It’s not always easy to recognize and take action when we’re being treated poorly. You deserve to be treated with love and respect, and you’ve already taken the first step on that path.

So here are some things to consider as you move forward:

Continue reading “Leaving an abusive relationship when you live together”