Domestic Violence and Evictions

Paper copy of eviction notice on brown front door with brass door handle

COVID-19 and evictions

Nationally, one in three renters is at risk of eviction because of financial hardship brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Even during the best of times, domestic violence survivors, especially BIPOC women, face economic hardship and are vulnerable to eviction. Women who experience recent or ongoing domestic violence are more likely to face eviction than any other group of women. And Black women face evictions at least three times the rate of other survivors.

COVID-related layoffs, reduced hours, sickness, and the loss of affordable child care have made things worse. Survivors who can no longer afford rent are worried about becoming homeless when Washington’s eviction moratorium ends on December 31 {Update: now extended to March 31, 2021}. Thanks to flexible funds from local governments, foundations, and individuals, LifeWire has provided many survivors with rental assistance, reducing their chance of becoming homeless in the coming months. Even so, too many survivors will face eviction in 2021.

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DV and its impact on transgender survivors

Black trans woman with curly red hair wearing a pink sweater looks in a mirror and dries her tears with a tissue.

Every person, regardless of their gender or sexual orientation, deserves to feel safe, respected, and loved in an intimate relationship

This week is Transgender Awareness Week, a time to raise the visibility of transgender people and address the issues they face. Transgender people are at high risk for abuse, with as many as 50% experiencing intimate partner violence at some point in their life. Like other survivors, they may be subject to emotional, economic, physical, and sexual abuse from their partners. Transgender survivors also face distinct abuse tactics and challenges accessing support.

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Domestic Violence and What You Can Do

Purple flower on black background, four ways you can take action against domestic violence

Safe and healthy families are the key to ensuring safe and vibrant communities. We each have the power to change our culture of violence to one of kindness and compassion through words and our actions. Here are ways you can help build a world free from violence, where everyone has the opportunity to thrive.

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Domestic Violence and Child Custody

Two boys sitting and hugging on a playground
Courts as a tool for abuse

People often think that when a parent leaves an abusive relationship they will gain primary custody of the children. But many family courts don’t consider domestic violence a reason to deny the abuser partial or full child custody.

Survivors often face an uphill custody battle. This is partly because abusers are more likely than non-abusers to challenge child custody decisions. And 70% of the time, abusers succeed in getting partial or full custody of the children.

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Domestic Violence and Reproductive Coercion

Empty package of birth control pills

What is Reproductive Coercion?

One in four survivors has experienced reproductive coercion, yet few people are familiar with the term. Reproductive coercion is any behavior aimed at controlling a person’s reproductive choices. It can take many different forms, including throwing away birth control or poking holes in condoms, lying about a vasectomy, or forcing a partner to get pregnant or have an abortion. One of the most deceptive forms is “stealthing” or removing a condom during sex without a partner’s consent.

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